@jackyalciné

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A Thousand Stars

At the time of writing, I follow 838 people on GitHub. That’s almost as many people as I follow on Twitter (that being 1,286). I’m a bit of a stickler for digital social interactivity, be it in person or on the Web. GitHub allows me to not only watch the ebb and flow of software (and hardware!) projects but I can watch as a particular repository becomes more popular and gain traction; indirectly giving me enough reason to pick it for scrutiny.

:book: code :bookmark: github, progress, quantified self :clock7: :clock3: about 1 minute

At the time of writing, I follow 838 people on GitHub. That’s almost as many people as I follow on Twitter (that being 1,286). I’m a bit of a stickler for digital social interactivity, be it in person or on the Web. GitHub allows me to not only watch the ebb and flow of software (and hardware!) projects but I can watch as a particular repository becomes more popular and gain traction; indirectly giving me enough reason to pick it for scrutiny.

While this may prove to be a bit weird for those who don’t really follow code, I’ve been looking to saturate my knowledge of language style and project management by watching how people react to things on GitHub. For example, the ever famous comment between @fat and @douglascrockford is enough to have one take a bit of retrospect when it comes to what is actually an authoritative source of a language’s syntax (hint: no one but the community).

Another reason for my personal glimpses into people’s coding habits is checking out their system configuration. More commonly known as dotfiles, these files define the shell interactivity and can go as far as to define the ebb and flow of your user on your operating system. I have my own dotfiles stashed on GitHub and it’s made it a lot easier to share my shell’s configuration across multiple machines, be it in Vagrant, my laptop or a remote server. Making your shell more faster is like improving your reflexes; and doing the same for applications you use everyday is just working on top of that. I recommend taking a look at your ~/.profile, ~/.vimrc and the likes. Check out how your everyday tools work to see placements for improvements and optimizations and look to use this to make you a better shell user.